RED HEADED BOOK LOVER

Robert O. Martichenko, Author Spotlight

Author Spotlight

Robert O. Martichenko,  Author of Drift and Hum

Drift and Hum offers storytelling at its best, weaving through heights of laughter to lows of sorrow, with twist after twist.

Drift and Hum is a captivating debut novel about the kite ride of life and dealing with obstacles along the way. The story is told through the eyes of Sam, a 50-year-old South Carolina man who reflects from the present day back to his Canadian childhood to make sense of all of the challenges and universal entropy he has faced. His journey includes an extraordinary bond and friendship with three other boys as the four “Beaver Brothers” embark on adventure after adventure in their quest for peace of mind in the Canadian North and the American South. The characters will linger in your memory long after you finish the book, as will the powerful themes of father-son relationships and the coaching and mentoring we receive as we grow.

Hello book lovers! Today is a day where I will be writing another author spotlight for a well-accomplished author whose work I have loved. As you know book lovers I love learning about authors and the inspiration behind their work, it fascinates me and adds to the depth of the book because the reader will be able to better understand it. That is how the author spotlights were created because I soon discovered that you lovely readers ALSO love learning about author’s, so I am excited to tell you a little bit more about author Robert O. Martichenko whose book Drift and Hum transfixed me from beginning to end. I personally would recommend this book to all of those that love following somebody on a journey but really the book can be read by anybody as it is flawlessly written and highly enjoyable. With today’s author spotlight for Robert, a biography of the author and an interview between me and Robert will be shared, and I hope that you book lovers enjoy reading it! To kick this off here is an author bio about the wonderful Robert O. Martichenko!

Robert O. Martichenko is a Canadian-American entrepreneur, writer, poet, and public speaker.

Robert’s debut novel – Drift and Hum – won the 2017 Benjamin Franklin Gold Award for Best First Book – Fiction from the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA). The themes of Drift and Hum are also accessible through Robert’s Drift and Hum Podcast – focusing on stories about people, passion, and kindness.

As Founder and CEO of LeanCor Supply Group, Robert is an industry thought leader, business author, and two-time winner of the Shingo Research Award for advancing the body of knowledge of Operational Excellence through his publications. In 2016, The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) awarded Robert with the Distinguished Service Award, the highest recognition achievable for professionals in the supply chain industry.

Robert is a professional speaker addressing topics such as lean, operations management, and leadership. He participates and volunteers on multiple advisory boards and educational institutions.

Now, how wonderful does Robert sound?! Robert is a truly exceptional writer and I hope that you lovely readers have a read of Robert’s work because you will not regret it! Please see below an interview between me and Robert, I hope that you enjoy Robert’s answers to my questions, they are incredible and provide some great advice too!

Could you please tell us readers about your book and what inspired you to write your book?

Drift and Hum is a captivating novel about the kite ride of life and dealing with obstacles along the way. The story is told through the eyes of Sam, a 50-year-old South Carolina man who reflects from the present day back to his Canadian childhood to make sense of all of the challenges and universal entropy he has faced. His journey includes an extraordinary bond and friendship with three other boys as the four “Beaver Brothers” embark on adventure after adventure in their quest for peace of mind in the Canadian North and the American South.

In my mind, it’s simply a story. A simple story about growing up in Canada, moving to the USA, father-son relationships, dealing with tragedy, attempting to find peace of mind, friendship, coaching, mentoring, prospecting, business, gold, road trips, poetry, writing, music, hockey, God, the northern lights, lodges, addiction, dogs, vans, winter, summer, spring, fall, mental health, love, spirituality, entropy, life, death and the art of surviving in the middle.

Mostly though…it’s a book about Beavers.

I always knew I wanted to tell this story as much of it is autobiographical, although it is a book of fiction. Once I began writing, I truly believe I was kissed by the muse of writing and poetry, and the story just flowed out of me.

What would your advice be for aspiring writers?

This is the advice that I received. If you want to write a book, you have to write.  Just write.  Write anything, anytime, anywhere. Writing is about writing.

In your opinion, what is the most important thing about a book?

Relative to a novel, I believe the story needs to move the world forward. How do you take your dreams, experiences, and beliefs and write a story that just might impact people in a way that makes the world a better place?

For example, Drift and Hum is about shifting the tone of our world today to stories that matter. Stories that matter are stories that describe the positive going on in our world. Stories about people who live with enthusiasm, interest, and passion for actions and events that support kindness and respect for people and the earth. And as story-shifters, we can become a community. A community that is not interested in hate, anger, fear, negative biases, or divisiveness. A community where we recognize the only way to make the world a better place is to sound off more positive vibes than negative vibes. Where we recognize that life is short, and it’s critical to take time for what is important. To take time to see the positive in the world, to believe in the good of people, in the diversity of people, and to live a life surrounded by nature, sport, art, poetry, music, and interesting people with great stories. In other words, to take time to drift and hum.

What is your writing process like?

Writing for me happens in two ways. First, I am constantly writing in my mind as I progress through my day. Second, you have to get the story out on paper. The latter for me is not structured as I have a busy day job in addition to my writing aspirations.

When I set out to write Drift and Hum, I had a goal of writing 72,000 words…the approximate length of Catcher in the Rye. When Drift and Hum was finally complete, it was over 190,000 words. Truth be told, I’m not sure what happened. I simply sat down at my laptop, in airports and hotel rooms while working, and the story poured onto the screen. On occasion, I would take an entire weekend and just write.  At some level, the two-year lead time was really a function of my inadequate typing abilities and having time to get back to the story while living a busy life.

What kind of research do you do, and how long do you spend researching before beginning a book?

Prior to writing Drift and Hum, I read a couple of books on How to Write a Novel, and then I think I unintentionally set out to break every rule that the books advocated. Yes, Drift and Hum is probably too long for the average attention span these days; yes, Drift and Hum probably has far too many themes throughout the story; and yes, I have no idea who the target audience is for the book. However, the story is what the story is, and that is what’s most important.  At some level, I do not believe I was actually in control of the story…it had a mind of its own (the muse again).

Do you have a set schedule for writing, or do you only write when you feel inspired?

I don’t have a set schedule, and at times I write when I’m inspired to write.  However, you have to force yourself to sit down and write as you will not always feel like it. I travel for work so I attempt to use any wasted time – airports, plane rides, hotel stays. Even if you only have fifteen minutes, pick up your laptop and get words on the screen.

Do you read much and if so, who are your favorite authors?

So, before I wrote Drift and Hum, I read a lot but after I finished the novel, I struggled to pick up a book of fiction. I suspect I was burned out a little. I am now getting back in the groove. My favorite authors are Mark Twain and Robert Service (poetry).

Lastly, when can we readers expect to read more wonderful books from you?

I hope sometime soon. I am writing in my mind and waiting for the next kiss of the muse.

In the meantime, I’ll leave this for you

Muses

Muses amuse as they touch your soul

Creativity abounds outside your control

Images and stories strike a lightning rod

An artistic delivery system designed by gods

Where are the origins from which it evolves?

These are the mysteries not meant to be solved

Embrace your canvas, a quiet absence of stress

And wait for the kiss of a Greek princess

Its official book lovers, I am obsessed with Robert O. Martichenko! If you have liked what you have read about Robert and are interested in learning more about Robert O. Martichenko and reading Robert’s work, then please do have a browse of the links below and be sure to have a read of the preview too! You will not regret it.

Goodbye for now book lovers,

 

Drift and Hum: Review by Aimee Ann – Amazon U.S. – Amazon U.K. – Goodreads

Robert O. Martichenko: Facebook – Blog – Podcast – Website – Twitter

 

 

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